Week 8′s OCCT events

This week we have rich seminar-discussions in *two* of our core strands. Do come if you can!

Languages of Criticism: Robert Chard and Stephen Harrison on the Practice of Commentary

Tuesday 11th March, 4-6pm, St Anne’s College, Seminar Room 8

Dr Robert Chard (Oriental Studies) on Commentary and the Confucian Ritual Canon, and Prof Stephen Harrison (Classics) on Commentary and Reception in Classics. As they traverse their diverse materials the talks will explore how and why commentary expands on and extrapolates from its source texts, and how it can invent in the name of correcting.  Xiaofan Amy Li will chair. There  will be drinks and ample time for discussion. All welcome! *NB this event is taking place in St Anne’s College, not in TORCH*

Cultures of Mind-Reading: The Novel and Other Minds Terence Cave, Ben Morgan and Sowon Park on Joseph Conrad’s Lord Jim

Wednesday 12 March, 4-6.30pm, Lecture Room (2nd Floor), Radcliffe Humanities

“Approaches to fiction: Conrad’s ‘Lord Jim’”
Chair: Sowon Park (Corpus Christi/English)
Speakers:
Terence Cave (St John’s/French): “Sitting on the verandah with Marlow: cognitively inflected reading”
Ben Morgan (Worcester/German): “What is is fiction for? Marlow and other minds”

*NB there has been a change of room for this event. It will take place in the Lecture Room (2nd Floor) and not in the Colin Matthew Room on the ground floor as previously advertised.* Again there will be drinks and ample time for discussion; and again all are welcome!

The recording of Peter Ghosh’s and Jonathan Katz’s talks on Translation and Fictionality (from the Translators and Writers strand) is now available here.

The last meeting of the Comparative Criticism Postgraduate Reading Group this term will take place at St Anne’s as usual but in a different room (Seminar Room 3), on Monday 10th March. The text for the meeting will be Walter Mignolo’s ‘Delinking: The rhetoric of modernity, the logic of coloniality and the grammar of de-coloniality’, Cultural Studies 21:2-3 (2007), 449-514. Please read it here. NB it is rather long (60-odd pages).

There is also another event organised by TORCH this week with help from OCCT:

Activist Humanities in the World

Friday – Saturday 14th – 15th March | Radcliffe Humanities and Ertegun House
Panels include “Migration and Translation”, “Social Practice and Subversive Action” and “Religion and Secularism”

For more information about the panels ‘Migration and Translation’ chaired by Matthew Reynolds, and ‘Religion and Secularism’ chaired by Mohamed-Salah Omri, please see here.

Outside Oxford, there is the UCL Translation in History Lecture Series, with Dr Willem Smelik (UCL - Department of Hebrew & Jewish Studies) giving the next lecture on Thursday 13 March from 6-7.30 pm in Lecture Theatre G6, UCL Institute of Archaeology. This lecture will focus on the rabbinic views of translation against the background of their views on language. See our Links Page for more information.

The Bristol Watershed is putting up a Translation/ Transmission series. For more details and their March events, see here.

There is a new monthly series on “Translation and Transdisciplinarity” starting at the Centre d’études de la traduction de l’université Paris Diderot.  The first event will take place on Monday, 10th March 2014 – 17h30-19h30. “L’épigénétique au prisme de la traduction”. Jonathan Weitzman et Olivier Putois (discussion: Élise Pestre).

There are more calls for papers available on the Links Page.

Week 7′s OCCT events

Translators and Writers: Peter Ghosh and Jonathan Katz on Translation and Fictionality

Tuesday 4th March, 4-6pm, St Anne’s College, Seminar Room 8

Mr Peter Ghosh, a historian and translator of Max Weber, and Dr Jonathan Katz, a classicist and translator of Joseph Roth, explore how the distinction between fiction and non-fiction might matter to translation. Chaired by Patrick McGuinness. All welcome! *NB this event is taking place in St Anne’s College, not in TORCH*

The recording of Salim Bachi’s, Patrick Crowley’s, and Mohamed-Salah Omri’s talks on Rethinking the Political through Intercultural Aesthetics is now available here.

The last meeting of the Comparative Criticism Postgraduate Reading Group this term will take place at St Anne’s as usual but in a different room (Seminar Room 3), on Monday 10th March (week 8). The text for the meeting will be Walter Mignolo’s ‘Delinking: The rhetoric of modernity, the logic of coloniality and the grammar of de-coloniality’, Cultural Studies 21:2-3 (2007), 449-514. Please read it here. NB it is rather long (60-odd pages).

There are also some new calls for papers: Revolution & Evolution, BCLA Graduate Conference,  10th-11th July 2014, University of Essex; and UC Berkeley Conference for the spring 2014 semester on the topic of the role of theory in the future of the humanities. See our Links page.

Make an Aria 27th Feb

This term’s creative project, Make an Aria, a collaboration between young writers and composers, culminates on Thursday 27th Feb with a public performance at 8pm in the Jacqueline du Pre Music Building, St Hilda’s. In addition, Judith Weir and Michael McCarthy (Music Theatre Wales) will offer commentary on the processes of translation between words and music, and music and words.

Week 6′s OCCT events

A reminder of the events taking place this week:

Intercultural Literary Practices: Rethinking the Political through Intercultural Aesthetics

Wednesday, 26th February, 4-6.30pm, Colin Matthew Room, Radcliffe Humanities.

Poster _ Salim Bachi

Salim Bachi is author of Le Chien d’Ulysse (2001), Le Silence de Mahomet (2010), Moi, Khaled Khelkal (2012), and other books. He will read from his work (with a translation provided), and discuss the seminar theme.
Other speakers are: Patrick Crowley (University College Cork) and Mohamed-Salah Omri (Oriental Studies). Jane Hiddleston (Modern Languages) will chair.

More details here. All welcome!

Other news and events:

The video of the discussion of  Matthew Reynolds’s latest book Likenesses, with Jason Gaiger, Adriana Jacobs, and Nick Halmi, is here, and a written account of it is  here.

The recording of Derek Matravers (The Open University) on Malcolm Budd’s “The Intersubjective Validity of Aesthetic Judgements” can be listened to here, with a personalised report on the session as seen as by Céline Sabiron and Xiaofan Amy Li.

This week you might also be interested in attending the Oxford Postgraduate Comparative Criticism Reading Group meeting at St Anne’s College on Monday, 24th February (12.45-2pm; lunch provided). The reading is an essay by William Ernest Hocking, called ‘Comparative Philosophy for the ‘Emerging World Culture’”, which you can download here: http://site.ebrary.com/lib/bodleian/docDetail.action?docID=10574179. (Hocking’s essay is Chapter 1 in Robert W. Smid (ed.), Methodologies of Comparative Philosophy: The Pragmatist and Process Traditions. Albany: SUNY Press, 2009). The final meeting of the term in 8th week will focus on the emerging theory of decoloniality, as coined by Walter Mignolo et al.

In other events outside Oxford, there is the UCL Translation in History Lecture Series (27 Feb; from 6-7.30 pm in Lecture Theatre G6, UCL Institute of Archaeology.). http://www.ucl.ac.uk/translation-studies/translation-in-history/current-series

Week 5′s OCCT events

A reminder of this week’s event:

Philosophy of Criticism

Prof Derek Matravers (The Open University) on Malcolm Budd’s “The Intersubjective Validity of Aesthetic Judgements”.

Tuesday February 18th, 4-6pm, Ryle Room, Radcliffe Humanities.

Speaker homepage. The paper is available to Oxford participants here via Weblearn. Those who are unable to read all of it may focus on sections XII to XV (p359-end).

All welcome.

In other news:  we will post a link to the podcast video of the last Torch Book Series event (Matthew Reynolds’s presentation of his latest book, Likenesses) as soon as it has been released. Other events this week in Oxford: The Ibsen Phenomenon on Feb, 21st, and outside Oxford, public lecture by Prof Susan Bassnett  the importance of translation in comparative literature, Feb, 18th, 11am, at the University of Limerick. More details of these events are here.

Week 4′s OCCT events

A reminder of our Programme’s first participation in the TORCH Book Series

Book at Lunchtime, Wednesday 12th February | 12:45 to 14:00 | Radcliffe Humanities

The themes raised by Matthew Reynolds’ Likenesses: Translation, Illustration, Interpretation will be discussed by Dr Jason Gaiger (Ruskin School), Dr Adriana Jacobs (Oriental Studies) and Dr Nick Halmi (English). Lunch from 12:45, with a discussion from around 13:10 to 13:40. All welcome.

Poster _ Likenesses

About the book:

Translation, illustration and interpretation have at least two things in common. They all begin when sense is made in the act of reading: that is where illustrative images and explanatory words begin to form. And they all ask to be understood in relation to the works from which they have arisen: reading them is a matter of reading readings. Likenesses explores this palimpsestic realm, with examples from Dante to the contemporary sculptor Rachel Whiteread, at once teasing apart the laminated textuality and staying alert to the fact that criticism inevitably adds a new layer of its own. Browning emerges as a key figure because his poems combine languages, places, times and modes of utterance with such taut energy. There are also substantial, innovative accounts of Dryden, Stubbs, Goya, Turner, Tennyson, Ungaretti and many more.

In other news: a recording and report of our recent seminar, in the Philosophy of Criticism series, with Prof. Matthew Kieran (Leeds) on Creativity as a Virtue of Character, is available here. Don’t forget to check the Links Page for events in Oxford and beyond, international conferences and calls for papers.

Seminar Today Tuesday 28th Jan

A reminder of the seminar today in our Philosophy of Criticism and Languages of Criticism 
braid:

Prof Matthew Kieran (Leeds) on Creativity as a Virtue of Character

Tuesday January 28th, 4-6pm, Colin Matthew Room, Radcliffe Humanities.

Preparatory reading is here.and the speaker’s homepage is here.

Enquiries: Dr Andrew Klevan (andrew.klevan@st-annes.ox.ac.uk)

 

This Term’s Programme

Comp Crit HT 2014 poster

 

 

 

We have a packed programme this term.

NB we are trying out some different days and times.

 

 

 

Our Graduate-Led Discussion Group meets on Mondays of even weeks, 12.45-2pm, Seminar Room 6, St Anne’s College. Details are here. The Orlando Furioso Reading Group meets on Wednesdays of even weeks, 1.30-3pm, in the Jean Robinson Room, Keble. Details are here.

 

 

WEEK 2

Philosophy of Criticism: Prof Matthew Kieran (Leeds) on Creativity as a Virtue of Character

Tuesday January 28th, 4-6pm, Colin Matthew Room, Radcliffe Humanities.

Speaker homepage, and pre-seminar reading freely available here.

WEEK 4

TORCH Book at LunchtimeLikenesses

Wednesday, February 12th, 12.45-2pm, Seminar Room, Radcliffe Humanities,

Jason Gaiger (Ruskin School), Adriana Jacobs (Oriental Studies) and Nick Halmi (English) discuss Likenesses: Translation, Illustration, Interpretation by Matthew Reynolds

Poster _ Likenesses

WEEK 5

Philosophy of CriticismProf Derek Matravers (The Open University) on Malcolm Budd’s “The Intersubjective Validity of Aesthetic Judgements”

Tuesday February 18th, 4-6pm, Ryle Room, Radcliffe Humanities.

Speaker homepage. The paper is available to Oxford participants here via Weblearn. Those who are unable to read all of it may focus on sections XII to XV (p359-end).

WEEK 6

Intercultural Literary Practices: Rethinking the Political through Intercultural Aesthetics

Wednesday, 26th February, 4-6.30pm, Colin Matthew Room, Radcliffe Humanities.

Poster _ Salim Bachi

Salim Bachi is author of Le Chien d’Ulysse (2001), Le Silence de Mahomet (2010), Moi, Khaled Khelkal (2012), and other books. He will read from his work (with a translation provided), and discuss the seminar theme.
Other speakers are: Patrick Crowley (University College Cork) and Mohamed-Salah Omri (Oriental Studies). Jane Hiddleston (Modern Languages) will chair.

More details here.

Make an Aria: Finale

Thursday 27 February, Jacqueline du Pre Music Building, St Hilda’s

Masterclasses Noon-6pm; Public Performance 8pm

WEEK 7

Translators and Writers: Peter Ghosh and Jonathan Katz on Translation and Fictionality

Tuesday 4th March, 4-6pm. St Anne’s College, Seminar Room 8

Mr Peter Ghosh, a historian and translator of Max Weber, and Dr Jonathan Katz, a classicist and translator of Joseph Roth, explore how (if at all) the distinction between fiction and non-fiction might matter to translation. Chaired by Patrick McGuinness.

WEEK 8

Languages of Criticism: Robert Chard and Stephen Harrison on the Practice of Commentary

Tuesday 11th March, 4-6pm, St Anne’s College, Seminar Room 8

Dr Robert Chard (Oriental Studies) on Commentary and the Confucian Ritual Canon, and Prof Stephen Harrison (Classics) on Commentary and Reception in Classics. Chaired by Xiaofan Amy Li.

Cultures of Mind-ReadingTerence Cave, Ben Morgan and Sowon Park on Joseph Conrad’s Lord Jim

Wednesday 12 March, 4-6.30pm, Colin Matthew Room, Radcliffe Humanities